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component:data [2021/02/07 09:05]
tshaw [Examples]
component:data [2021/02/07 09:42] (current)
tshaw [Examples]
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 The SENDER must: The SENDER must:
-  * Read the RECEIVER'​s public key (rPublic), unserialize it, and rebuild the key object.+  ​* *\*\*Read the RECEIVER'​s public key (rPublic), unserialize it, and rebuild the key object.
   * Generate a public key (sPublic) and private key (sPrivate).   * Generate a public key (sPublic) and private key (sPrivate).
   * *Generate an encryption key using rPublic and sPrivate.   * *Generate an encryption key using rPublic and sPrivate.
   * Generate an Initialization Vector (IV).   * Generate an Initialization Vector (IV).
   * Convert sPublic into a string with sPublic.serialize().   * Convert sPublic into a string with sPublic.serialize().
-  * Serialize the data using the serialization library, then encrypt it using the encryption key and IV.+  ​* *\*\*Serialize the data using the serialization library, then encrypt it using the encryption key and IV.
   * Serialize and transmit the message, with sPublic and IV in plain-text.   * Serialize and transmit the message, with sPublic and IV in plain-text.
  
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 **NOTE*** In the above, the terms '​encryption key' and '​decryption key' are used. These keys are, byte-for-byte,​ the same. This is because both keys were generated using the `ecdh()` function. **NOTE*** In the above, the terms '​encryption key' and '​decryption key' are used. These keys are, byte-for-byte,​ the same. This is because both keys were generated using the `ecdh()` function.
  
-**NOTE**** In the above, it is stated that //you will manually transfer rPublic to SENDER//. This would not be the case in systems that employ a handshake protocol. For example, SENDER would make themselves known to RECEIVER, who will then reply to SENDER with a public key (and possibly additional information,​ such as key-length). For simplicity, the following examples will not cover the functions of handshake protocols.+**NOTE**\** In the above, it is stated that //you will manually transfer rPublic to SENDER//. This would not be the case in systems that employ a handshake protocol. For example, SENDER would make themselves known to RECEIVER, who will then reply to SENDER with a public key (and possibly additional information,​ such as key-length). For simplicity, the following examples will not cover the functions of handshake protocols
 + 
 +**NOTE***** The examples above and below state that you must serialize/​unserialize a key or message. In-general, it is good practice to serialize data (especially when in binary format) before you write it to a file, or transfer it on the network. Serialization makes sure that the binary data is '​escaped',​ making it safe for your script or shell to read.
  
 To send an encrypted message: To send an encrypted message: